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Ernst-Wilhelm Modrow

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Victories : 33
-----------------------------
Country : Germany
Fought in : WW2
Fought for : Axis


Awarded the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross
Knights
Cross


Latest Axis Aviation Artwork !
 Fiat CR.42 'Falco' belonging to 162a Squadriglia, 161ø Gruppo, Regia Aeronautica.  The unit badge bears the words <i>Varda che te sbrego!</i> - 'Beware - I'll tear you open!'.

Fiat CR.42 'Falco' by Jerry Boucher.
 It is a record likely to stand for all time, Erich Hartmann's tally of 352 victories is more than any other pilot in history.  Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of Paule Rossman, one of the unit's most experienced and respected Aces.  However, during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel.  His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first ever victory, he was shot down - again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded.  Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and , with Rossman's help and guidance, it was not long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill.  By the summer of 1943 <i>the Blond Knight</i> and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory.  Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute.  Often flying head on, the risks of collision and damage were great - of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim!  Hartmann's 352 victories were achieved with JG52 - all except one.  It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53.  His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever.  <i>The Blond Knight</i>portrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem's snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4th February he downed a Yak-9.  It was his 337th victory.

The Blond Knight by Robert Taylor.
 Those Aces with over 100 victories were exceptional.  To reach 200 victories was a spectacular achievement.  Yet two men went even further and accomplished a feat that will never be repeated - both of them shot down more than 300 enemy aircraft which placed them in a league of their own.  They were the elite of the elite, and their names are legendary - Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn.  It is no surprise that these iconic Aces scored their victories whilst flying with the legendary fighter wing JG52.  Active from the beginning of the war, the unit fought in the Battle of France, but suffered terrible losses during the Battle of Britain before transferring to the Eastern Front at the outset of Operation Barbarossa, and it was here that it solidified its fearsome reputation.  Operating the Bf109 throughout the war, the Geschwader boasted some of the greatest Luftwaffe pilots of world war two among its ranks - including the top three Aces of all time.  Such renowned pilots as Gunther Rall (275 victories), Wilhelm Batz (237 victories), Hermann Graf (212 victories) and Helmut Lipfert (203 victories) helped this formidable unit notch up more than 10,000 victories, making it the most successful fighter wing in history.  <i>Hunters at Dawn</i> features Hptm. Gerhard Barkhorn, Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG52.  The great Ace, flying his Bf109 G-6, leads the Stab as they climb out from their base near the Black Sea, early November 1943.  The crisp air of day break is temporarily punctuated by the roar of Daimler-Benz engines as the deadly Messerschmitt fighters set off on their daily hunt for Soviet aircraft over the front line.

Hunters at Dawn by Robert Taylor.
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.

Ernst-Wilhelm Modrow

Squadrons for : Ernst-Wilhelm Modrow
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Ernst-Wilhelm Modrow. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

NJG1


Country : Germany
'Ace of Hearts'

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of NJG1
NJG1

Full profile not yet available.

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