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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £155!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £210!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £130!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £220!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson

David Dipnall
Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

 A Lancaster heads out to its target as the sun sets.

Long Night Ahead by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Royal Flying Corps SE5As of 56 squadron engaged in air combat with flying circus Fokker Dr1s commanded by the great German ace Baron von Richthofen, France 1917.

Brief Encounter by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target.  Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command.  The first four Squadrons - Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) - were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson. (XX)
Few pilots can resist the temptation for low flying should the opportunity present itself. Out of sight of the spoil-sport eyes of the authority, the rules will be broken, the artist would indulge in this chancy but undeniable thrill. A great sensation from any cockpit but for the artist nothing can compare with the effect from behind a pair of goggles to the accompaniment of humming wires around the cockpit of a Tiger Moth.

Happy Days by Gerald Coulson.

Published in 1994, this classic English landscape by Gerald Coulson was published by Solomon and Whitehead, a company who are no longer publishing.

Country Life by Gerald Coulson.
 The Avro Lancaster was possibly the most versatile and successful bomber aircraft ever and certainly became the backbone of RAF Bomber Command during WWII. Being able to deliver a greater payload than any other aircraft of The War, the Lancaster was involved in nearly every night bombing raid on Europe and undertook some of the most famous bombing missions in History.  Of all the crews of RAF Bomber Command 617 Squadron are perhaps the best known. Famed for their expertise in precision bombing they took part in some of the most daring raids of the War. Many of the crews such as Guy Gibson, Leonard Cheshire and Bill Reid became household names and their exploits are well documented. This superb painting by Gerald Coulson is a tribute to all those crews who flew with Bomber Command. Each print is personally signed by prominent crew who flew with 617 Squadron during WWII. Coulsons painting captures the moment perfectly. As the sun is setting in the early part of 1944 over their Lincolnshire airfield , groundcrews make final preparations to the Lancasters of 617 Squadron. Beneath the mighty aircraft crews ready themselves for a long , gruelling night operation over occupied Europe.

A Lincolnshire Sunset 1944 by Gerald Coulson. (XX)
an all time classic image of the Lancaster bomber of Bomber ommand being prepared by the RAF ground crew.  The ground crew showed their expertise and commitment in keeping these superb bombers ready and in top condition in all weather.  In this atmospheric classic image, Gerald Coulson shows the gorund crew preparing the Lancaster, a great  stalwart of Bomber Command during the second world war.  A superb partner painting to the other classic Gerald Coulson image,  Outbound lancaster.

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest by Gerald Coulson.
Flying secret agents in and out of occupied France, transporting arms and radio equipment to the Resistance, and collecting downed airmen from behind enemy lines, was one of the most hazardous flying operations of World War II. These cloak and dagger sorties, always conducted at night by the light of the moon, required a cool head and inordinate flying and navigational skills - a duty performed courageously by the pilots of RAF Special Duty Squadrons. Due to their clandestine nature, the true magnitude of their operations only became fully appreciated when the war was over.

Moonlight by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Captain Wayne L Coleman

Joining the service in January 1943, Wayne Coleman was posted to the 82nd Squadron, 78th Fighter Group at Duxford, near Cambridge in July 1944. He flew the first of his 75 combat missions a few days later on August 2nd in P-47s, dive-bombing and strafing in support of the Normandy invasion before converting to P-51s at the end of the year. Wayne shot down three Fw190s in a single mission and later on 31st March 1945, an Me262 jet. He flew continuously until the end of the war.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 VC.10, serial No 885 was the last of its type to be built at Brooklands and is seen here taking to the air on 16th February 1970 in her East African Airlines livery as 5H-MOG. This aircraft was later acquired by the Royal Air Force and registered as ZA150, serving as a K3 with 101 Sqn until her eventual retirement in 2013, this veteran of 43 years service landing for the final time at Dunsfold where she will be preserved as part of the Brooklands Museum.

Last of the Line by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 The Junkers Ju.287 V1 bomber prototype was a typical example of Germany's research into advanced aerodynamics at the end of World War II. Featuring forward swept wings and four Jumo 004B-1 Orkan axial-flow turbojets, this extraordinary aircraft made several successful flights before the project was curtailed by the war's end. RS+RA is shown on a test flight, carrying a cine camera in front of the fin to record airflow by means of wool tufts glued to the wings and fuselage sides. The characteristics of forward swept wings are only now being re-evaluated, 70 years after Junkers' first tentative steps into the unknown.

A New Shape in the Sky by Ivan Berryman. (P)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 Aircraft number 2247, flown by Lt McElroy, attacks the Yokosuka Yard near Tokyo. He was one of the 18 B25 Mitchell bombers which took part in the famous retaliatory raid on Japan.

Doolittle Raider, Tokyo, April 18th 1942 by David Pentland. (GL)
 Spitfire Mk9. of 56 squadron patrol the D-Day landings.

Normandy Beach Head Patrol by Geoff Lea (P)
B129.  Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman.

Concorde over Manhattan by Ivan Berryman.
The Fw190A-4 was introduced in July 1942, and was equipped with the same engine and basic armament as the A-3. A total of 976 A-4s were built between June 1942 and March 1943.  Some of the  most successful fighter aces of the Luftwaffe flew the Fw190.  Otto Kittel scored 267 vicotries, Erich Rudorffer claimed 222 kills, and Walter Nowotny 258 victories. The majority of their kills were scored while flying the Fw190.

Fw190A-4, Winter 1944 by Ivan Berryman.
Mustang P51 Nooky Booky IV flown by Captain Leonard Kit Carson of the 362nd Fighter Squadron, 357th Fighter Group, giving fighter escort top cover protection to the B17s of 381st Bomb Group, returning after a raid in Germany, January 1944. Kit Carson ended the war as top scorer of the 357th with 18.5 aerial victories in the last 6 months of the war.

Mustang Escort by Graeme Lothian.
 A pair of Spitfire Mk 1s of 92 Sqn, based at Pembrey, practising dogfight tactics in a rare moment of relative peace in August 1940.  Nearest aircraft, N3249, (QJ-P) is that of Sgt Ralph <i>Titch</i> Havercroft who was to score 3 confirmed victories, 2 unconfirmed, one shared and three probables during his combat career.

Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.
Mustangs of 434th Fighter Squadron head across the Channel.  On 25th May 1944, pilots of the 434 Fighter Squadron flew their first combat mission.  In the early hours of 6 thJune, D-Day, included in the 12,000 aircraft which flew cover, interdiction or other support missions were 434th pilots, some who flew three missions, returning to base long enough to refuel and rearm.  Not until 29th July 1944 did the 434 Fighter Squadron down its first aircraft , when 1 Lt Arthur F. Jeffrey, one of the original six pilots assigned to the squadron, bagged an Me-163 Komet, a rocket-propelled interceptor.  Over the next nine months squadron members flew bomber escort missions, attacked air fields and flew other missions as required, including support of beleaguered ground forces around Bastogne, Belgium, better known as the Battle of the Bulge.  On 25th April 1945, pilots flew their last combat mission and 1 Lt Hilton O. Thomas shot down the last aircraft credited to an Eighth Air Force pilot - an Arado 234 Blitz, a jet-powered bomber.  Of the four aces the from the 434th Fighter Squadron, three top aces evolved - Arthur F. Jeffery, Robin Olds and George W. Gleason.

Gathering Storm by Anthony Saunders (GL)
 Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s, of the 281a Suadriglia based in Libya in 1940, begin their journey home after another successful mission against Allied shipping in the Mediterranean.  Nearest aircraft is 281-5, that of Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia.

Hunters Homeward Bound by Ivan Berryman. (GL)

FREE PRINTS

Purchase any print from our special selection of Gerald Coulson prints, and get a FREE print with it!

FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

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Coulson Royal Air Force Prints ] Coulson US Air Force Prints ] Coulson German Air Force Prints ] Coulson Civilian Aircraft Prints ] Coulson Motor Racing Prints ] Coulson Landscapes ] Coulson Wildlife Prints ] Gerald Coulson Print List ]

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