Gerald Coulson Prints


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Gerald Coulson is without doubt one of the worlds top living artists. His paintings and prints of aviation art and landscape prints include many of the top selling images of the past 40 years. Many are now extremely rare. Cranston Fine Arts purchased the entire back catalogue of Gerald Coulson Solomon and Whitehead prints in 2008 and in 2011 purchased the aviation art prints from The Military Gallery. We do not sell to any other internet dealers so we can offer you great discounts and special packs at trade discount prices. We believe if a Gerald Coulson art collector wants to buy more than one or two prints then that collector should get the discount. You will find many rare and sought after pilot signed art prints here. Join our newsleter to get the latest special offers on Gerald Coulson art prints which are only available to newsletter and facebook members.



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Gerald Coulson Prints .com

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New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £170!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £190!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £145!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £210!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson


David Dipnall

Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

Published in 1994, this classic English landscape by Gerald Coulson was published by Solomon and Whitehead, a company who are no longer publishing.

Country Life by Gerald Coulson.
<b>Sold out at publisher.  We have the last 40 remaining prints.

The Edge of the Forest by Gerald Coulson.


Moonlit Lancaster by Gerald Coulson. (B)
A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of the Battle of Britain, as Spitfires of No.66 Squadron scramble.

Scramble by Gerald Coulson.

 The roar of Daimler-Benz engines at full power awakens the day as Gunther Lutzow, his aircraft still in the markings of his previous unit JG51, leads his Me109Fs of JG3 into combat from a snow covered airfield at Schatalowka on the Russian Front, in December 1941. With prints signed by no less than four veteran Me109 pilots who fought on the cruel Eastern Front, this is sure to be a valuable addition to any aviation art collection.

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson. (AP)
Military fast jets spend most of their operational time at very low level. Sparsely populated areas such as the valleys of North Wales, Scotland and the lakes of Cumbria, provide ideal training areas to perfect the skills required to hide behind high ground and remain undetected by enemy radar. Flying at 250 ft and 500 mph, two Jaguar GR1s from No2 squadron on a low level reconnaissance exercise are the subject of this painting.

Thunder in the Hills by Gerald Coulson.
<b>Ex display copies with slight mark on the border. </b>
Spitfire Magic by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Conceived initially by Hawkers (of Hurricane fame) as a fast powerful fighter, the Typhoons performance in this role proved to be disappointing in the respect of rate of climb, and at height. They did however eventually come into their own as a superlative very fast ground attack aircraft, and combined with the skill of their pilots became one of the most potent weapons of World War Two. This painting conveys something of the drama of a pair of typhoons at take-off, each loaded with two 1000lb bombs. Normandy dust contributes to the backdrop.

Striking Back by Gerald Coulson.

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Sqdn Ldr H C Baker

Just one month before the Battle began, Henry "Butch" Baker had already seen fierce fighting over Dunkirk where he shot down one German aircraft and damaged another. After surviving a car accident, he joined 41 Squadron on September 15 – viewed by many as Battle of Britain Day – when 17 squadrons fought off a major attack. Flew Spitfires and helped destroy seven Messerschmitts in the Battle.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)
It began in pitch darkness. June 6, 1944 was only a few minutes old when the Airborne Pathfinders drifted silently down from the sky above the fields of Normandy. At first their seemed nothing untoward about the drone of aircraft in the night sky. The German garrisons in Northern France were used to the noise of aircraft overhead after dark, but this night seemed particularly busy. Looking skyward a German sentry caught sight of parachutes floating down, clearly visible as the moon fleetingly broke through the clouds. For an instant he thought it was the crew jumping from a damaged bomber, but when he saw the mass of canopies floating earthwards, he knew it was no ordinary event. Within moments of raising the alarm the crackle of automatic gunfire confirmed his worst fears: The Invasion of France had begun. The first assault upon Hitlers Fortress Europe came from the sky. Shortly after midnight waves of aircraft and gliders delivered three Divisions of elite airborne troops into Normandy, their crucial objectives to seize vital bridges, secure strategic positions and clear the way for the coming aerial armada. As the first streaks of dawn came over the horizon on that historic day, and with American and British paratroops already engaged in furious fire fights, the mighty amphibious armada began landing on the beaches of Normandy. Above them waves of troop-carrying aircraft towing gliders stretched from the coast of France all the way back to England. Closely escorted by fighters, they delivered over 20,000 highly trained men into the battlefield of Northern France. By nightfall the first phase of the greatest military invasion in history was complete. Five Divisions were were ashore and the Allies had established a toehold in occupied Europe. For the Third Reich it was the beginning of the end. Without the advanced airborne assault, and the air supremacy achieved by the escort fighters, the amphibious landings could have been a disaster. Seen crossing the Normandy beaches are C-47 Dakotas of the 438th Troop Carrier Group towing CG-4 Waco gliders, closely escorted by P-51Bs of the 354 Fighter Group. Below, landing craft swarm ashore putting men and equipment on the beaches, and everything about this spectacular painting brings alive the events of that historic day a half a century ago.
D-Day The Airborne Assault by Robert Taylor. (GS)
The Battle of the Atlantic was fought by the Royal Navy and RAF Coastal Command against the U-boats. It was a long, deadly struggle in which Hitler’s prized U-boat fleet attempted to starve Britain of food, fuel and the materials of war by destroying the convoys that kept it supplied. The effective use of depth charges by Allied aircraft demanded an attack from extremely low level, but as each submarine was armed with 10 cannons, the dangers to the aircrews was immense.
Caught on the Surface by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 On Saturday, 9 August 1941 the unthinkable happened: the legendary Fighter leader Douglas Bader failed to return from a mission over northern France.  Immediately, without thought for their own safety, the fiercely loyal pilots of his Tangmere Wing set out on a sweep to search for him, hoping that he may have successfully baled out into the Channel. By nightfall, however, there was no sign of him and everyone feared that their famous Wing Leader might have been lost.  A few days later, however, the good news filtered into Tangmere; Bader, renowned as the Fighter Ace with artificial legs, had survived, albeit as a prisoner of war.
Bader Bus Company by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 A Schwarm of Bf109s from JG-52 are about to peel away and, with the battle-cry <i>Horrido!</i> ringing in their ears, dive to attack the flight of enemy aircraft spotted below.  JG-52: the name alone brought terror into the hearts of the Red Air Force pilots.  By the end of the war the Luftwaffe's most successful Geschwader had claimed over 10,000 victories, and from within its ranks emerged the top three scoring Aces in the history of air combat; Gerhard Barkhorn, Gunther Rall and, of course, the highest scorer of them all – Erich Hartmann.
JG52 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

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A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 Two De Havilland Mosquito FBMk VIs of 464 squadron set out on a low level mission in difficult weather conditions.

Low Level Raiders by Keith Woodcock. (Y)
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman.
 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (B)
In the Vietnam war Squadron VA-163 was stationed aboard the carrier Oriskany on its second cruise, the squadrons A-4 Skyhawks were led by Commander Wynn Foster, one of the navys most aggressive strike leaders, and under Air Wing Commander James Stockdale, the A-4 pilots racked up a formidable record as a top fighting unit.

Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux. Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air. Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction. Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC.

Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.
 George Beurling in Spitfire VC BR301 in action against a Macchi 202 over Malta in 1942.

Victory Over Malta by Ivan Berryman. (P)
SPECIAL
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FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

More Pages :

 

Gerald Coulson has been painting professionally for over 30 years.  the Fine Art Guild have placed him among the top ten best selling UK artists no less than 15 times in 12 years - 3 times at No. 1.  Coulson's first love was aircraft, studying them and drawing them at every opportunity, from an early age.  His apprenticeship as an aircraft engineer  then as an RAF Technician and later an engineer with British Airways, have allowed him an insight and intimate knowledge of the aircraft he paints.  Now a Vice President, he is a founder member of the Guild of Aviation Artists and four times winner of the Flight International Trophy for outstanding aviation painting.  He qualified for his pilots licence in 1960 and is still actively flying today - mostly vintage aircraft and can often be seen buzzing over the Fens of Cambridgeshire in a Tiger Moth.  Whatever the subject, whether aviation, landscape or portrait, his ability to capture the realism and mood of the scene is unsurpassed, making him one of the most collected and highly regarded artists in the world today. 

 

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