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Gerald Coulson is without doubt one of the worlds top living artists. His paintings and prints of aviation art and landscape prints include many of the top selling images of the past 40 years. Many are now extremely rare. Cranston Fine Arts purchased the entire back catalogue of Gerald Coulson Solomon and Whitehead prints in 2008 and in 2011 purchased the aviation art prints from The Military Gallery. We do not sell to any other internet dealers so we can offer you great discounts and special packs at trade discount prices. We believe if a Gerald Coulson art collector wants to buy more than one or two prints then that collector should get the discount. You will find many rare and sought after pilot signed art prints here. Join our newsleter to get the latest special offers on Gerald Coulson art prints which are only available to newsletter and facebook members.



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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

Gerald Coulson Prints .com

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RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £165!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £190!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £140!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £210!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson


David Dipnall

Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

<b>Sold out at publisher.  We have the last 100 remaining prints.
September Morning by Gerald Coulson.
The Vickers-Armstrong Wellington entered service life in the RAF in 1938 as a medium bomber. As the mainstay of the Bomber Command, it bore the initial brunt of the RAFs night offensive during 1940. Without the benefit of sophisticated navigation aids, the bomber crews had difficulty locating and hitting targets and also contending with rapidly improving German defences.  The picture depicts an incident at sunrise on the morning of 26th July 1940.  A Wellington 1c of 99 Squadron, based at Newmarket Heath, returns from a raid over Dortmund.  An engine fails over the North Sea and the aircraft, captained by Squadron Leader Sarll, struggled almost to its home base and crashed just south of Cambridge.  The crew survived.

Overdue by Gerald Coulson.
The Red Arrows.  Published in 1988 and signed by all 9 pilots of that season.

Synchro by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Big Brothers and Little Friends : the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitlers Nazi Germany, 1942-1945.

Top Cover by Gerald Coulson.

An all time classic landscape image of a lone stag at the water edge with the outstanding and magnificent backdrop of the mountains with firtree forests.  As the morning mists begin to lift, this majestic stag stands proudly in his domain.

Silent Majesty by Gerald Coulson.
GC0724C. Lancaster Lift-Off by Gerald Coulson.

Lancaster Lift-Off by Gerald Coulson. (C)
 Gerald Coulson's dramatic painting Bolt for the Blue, published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first flight of the Lightning, captures the very essence of this formidable fighter.  Seen climbing out of RAF Wattisham, a Lightning F.3 of Treble One Squadron scrambles to intercept an unidentified intruder plotted on the RAF's early warning radar.  Almost certainly it will be Russian, probably he will be escorted out of harms way, but the interceptor is armed with a pair of air-to-air missiles just in case.  A superb collector print for all who remember one of the greatest British fighters ever built.

A Bolt for the Blue by Gerald Coulson. (C)
 With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 Dambusters Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulsons painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey.

Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson. (B)

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Wing Commander Robert G Middlemiss DFC CD

Bob was born in Montreal in 1920 and was educated at Commercial High School of Montreal. After graduating from high school Bob Middlemiss accepted a track scholarship from an American College but war broke out and he volunteered to join the RCAF. He was told when an opening was available he would be called. In the interim, his Dad's Regiment, of which he was the RQSM, the 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars was mobilized as the 3rd Canadian Motorcycle Regiment. Bob decided to join as a trooper but was called by the Air Force and a few months later joined the RCAF on September 14, 1940. He received his flying training at 13 EFTS, St. Eugene, ON and 9 SFTS, Summerside, PEI where he received his wings. He was posted overseas and trained on Spitfires at 57 OTU, Hawarden, Cheshire. He was posted to 145 Squadron and then later to 41 Squadron. They carried out operations consisting of air defence patrols against high level and low level fighter bomber attacks, convoy patrols in the English Channel, fighter sweeps, bomber escort and low level rhubarbs. In June 1942, he was selected to serve with a team of Spitfire pilots posted to Malta. They were taken to within 700 miles of Malta on the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle and then launched to hopefully make the island. During his tour with 249 Squadron on Malta Bob shot down and destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged two others before he was shot down and wounded. After recuperating, he served as an Instructor at 52 OTU and then 53 OTU in England. From the OTU he was posted to 403 Squadron, part of the 127 Wing commanded by Johnnie Johnson, the highest scoring ace of WWII. Bob had the honour of flying as his number 2 on a number of sorties. After completing two tours of operations he returned to Canada and instructed on Hurricanes and Mosquitos.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 IAF Squadron Commander Avaham Lanir, flying an Israeli Air Force Mirage III high over the Syrian desert, scores a victory over a Syrian MiG-21 on 9 November 1972. Later, during the Yom Kippur War, his Mirage was hit by a Syrian missile ambush, forcing him to eject over enemy territory. Despite valiant efforts to rescue him, he was captured by the Syrians and died under interrogation.
Desert Victory by Robert Taylor.
 June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that <i>democracy is finished in England</i>. He was wrong.  Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.  Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.
Quiet Reflection by Richard Taylor.
 March 1944 and heavy snow has settled firmly over the frozen Lincolnshire countryside around RAF Fiskerton. For once the Lancasters of 49 Squadron stand quietly idle at their dispersal points around the perimeter of the airfield. It is a scene recreated at many other heavy bomber airfields across the east of England and the young airmen who crew these mighty machines now wait patiently for the inevitable thaw that will soon see them in combat again.  For some, however, the future is uncertain. Just a few weeks later, on 30 March 1944, during a raid on Nuremberg, more than 100 bombers would be shot down. In the space of a single night Bomber Command would suffer more men lost than Fighter Command during the entire Battle of Britain.  Bomber Command flew more than 389,000 sorties from 101 operational bases across the east of England during WWII and the aircrew that undertook these missions came from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and many countries under Nazi occupation. Every airman was a volunteer and with an average age of just 22 they were forced to grow up quickly, enduring frightening odds and suffering terrible losses - only the Nazi U-Boat force experienced a higher casualty rate.  Of the 125,000 men who served, 55,573 were killed. For every 100 airmen who joined Bomber Command, 45 would lose their lives, 6 would be seriously wounded and 8 made prisoners of war. Yet they resolutely overcame the overwhelming forces stacked against them, including some of the worst flying conditions imaginable and, never flinching from their task, flew until victory was finally achieved.
Ops On Hold by Richard Taylor.
 Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - is the holiest day in the Hebrew calendar and in Israel is marked by a national holiday but on that day in 1973 the unexpected happened. At 14.00 hours on 6 October the coalition of Arab states led by Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israeli positions. Thousands of Egyptian troops swarmed across the Suez Canal into Israeli held Sinai whilst in the north nearly 1,500 Syrian tanks backed by artillery thrust west towards Israel. Facing this sudden surprise attack on the Golan Heights were less than 200 Israeli tanks. In the air, too, Egyptian and Syrian air forces struck in a single, co-ordinated assault hitting the Israeli anti-aircraft defences and hoping to deliver a fatal blow.  Largely unprepared, Israel reeled however within hours it mobilised its fighting reserves and began a ferocious battle to stem the enemies advance. As Israeli tanks and infantry rushed to hold the front line and, in the north, push the enemy back, Israeli Air Force jets overhead fought a heroic battle to regain the initiative and control of the skies. It was grim work. Both Egyptian and Syrian forces were equipped with hundreds of Soviet-supplied SAM missiles but the tide of war was turning and a battered Israeli Air Force now went on the counter-offensive. And amongst their main targets were the heavily-defended Egyptian air bases that lay deep in the Nile delta.  Robert Taylor's powerful and dramatic painting depicts one such strike that took place on 14 October 1973, half way through the war, when Israeli F-4 Phantom fighter-bombers made simultaneous strikes against the Egyptian air bases at Mansoura and Tanta north of Cairo.  After the first wave struck the elite Egyptian MiG-21 units at El Mansoura, the other Phantom squadrons attacked Tanta in waves, turning to dog-fighting immediately after dropping their ordnance. Tanta was also home to two squadrons of Libyan Mirage 5s and the furious air battle that ensued involved countless fighter aircraft. Despite bitter opposition, the successful IAF missions eliminated much of the effectiveness of the Egyptian Air Force and its Libyan allies.
Double Strike by Robert Taylor.
 Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resistance. Or so he believed. In response to a massed formation of enemy aircraft detected heading for London, Air Vice Marshal Keith Park commanding 11 Group scrambled his squadrons. He also requested that 12 Group bring Douglas Bader's 'Big Wing' down from Duxford. Every available pilot and machine was committed. Prime Minister Winston Churchill turned to Park and asked +What other reserves have we+ +There are none+, Park replied. Bader now had five squadrons racing south, meeting what remained of the enemy on the outskirts of London. With a successful morning behind them the RAF fighters raced back to re-fuel and re-arm. Just after 14.00 hrs another enemy battle group was observed and this time the formations were even larger. Bader's Wing was scrambled once more.

The Greatest Day by Robert Taylor.
 September 1940 and they came in their hundreds, the black crosses under their wings clearly visible to those on the ground who listened in silence as the menacing drone of a thousand engines filled the clear blue summer sky.  As Goering's Luftwaffe attempted to deal the killer blow to British defences, huge formations of Heinkel, Dornier and Junker bombers lumbered over sleepy English fields towards London.  Surrounding them were their escorts, the formidable Messerschmitt Bf109 fighters.  Diving our of the sun, 11 Group's fighter squadrons pounced, with the Spitfires going for the Bf109s while the Hurricanes fell on the slower moving bombers.  Looking up on the swirling melee above, onlookers below could only watch in awe as the sky was filled with criss-cross patterns of creamy white vapour and spiralling trails of ominous, darker smoke.  A parachute here and there caught the eye as the white silk drifted slowly down to the fields below.  Hugely outnumbered, the men of RAF Fighter Command were supported by volunteer airmen from fifteen nations, and as more squadrons joined the fray the battle raged towards the capital until the Bf109s turned for home.  The Few were finally turning the tide of the Battle of Britain.

Fields of Glory by Richard Taylor.
 They came from every corner of Britain.  And mostly they were young.  These fresh faced fighter pilots, joined by an ever-growing band of volunteer airmen from the British Commonwealth and those who had managed to escape from the occupied countries of Europe would, over the summer of 1940, not only hold the world's most powerful air force at bay, they would defeat it.  Richard Taylor's stunning piece graphically conveys the conflicting realities of those deadly aerial encounters over southern England during 1940.  As the sound of Merlin engines briefly interrupts the tranquility of a sleepy English village, its residents are determined to carry on with everyday life.  In the skies overhead the bitter battle will shortly be reaching its crescendo but, for today at least, the fighting is over as Flight Sergeant George 'Grumpy' Unwin, one of the Battle of Britain's top Aces, and the Spitfire pilots of 19 Squadron return from yet another encounter with Goering's much-vaunted Luftwaffe.

Return From the Fray by Richard Taylor.
 A trio of Spitfire Mk1s of 603 Sqn based at Biggin Hill are depicted on patrol in the Summer skies above Kent during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. Lead aircraft is N3288 XT-H flown by Plt Off George Gilroy who finished the war with 14 confirmed victories, 10 shared and a further 14 aircraft destroyed in actions in which he was directly involved.

Biggin Trio by Ivan Berryman.

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (D)
 On 8th October 1914, war in the air changed forever with what would become the first successful strategic bombing raid on Germany. As bad weather threatened to frustrate their mission, two little Sopwith Tabloids took off in search of the giant Zeppelin sheds at Cologne and Dusseldorf, one piloted by Squadron Commander D A Spenser Grey and the other by Flight Lieutenant Reggie Marix. Grey was beaten by poor visibility and instead chose to bomb the railway station at Cologne whilst Marix located the primary target and bombed it at once from a height of just 600ft. Almost immediately, the mighty LZ.25 that was housed inside began to burn and then blew up spectacularly, the fireball threatening to engulf Marixs Tabloid. Both Marix and Grey were awarded the Distinguished Service Order for their efforts. The age of aerial bombing had arrived.

Flight Lieutenant R L G Marix by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 A veteran of over 150 missions flying the DH.4, Captain Euan Dickson was credited with an impressive 14 victories during his service with both the RNAS and RAF. After the war, Dickson returned to New Zealand where he continued to fly, pioneering mail routes and becoming the first man to fly across Cook Strait in 1920. His 205 Squadron DH.4 is shown here as Observer / Gunner V Robinson rakes an attacking Pfalz D.III on 3rd May, 1918, sending it spiraling to the ground out of control.

Captain Euan Dickson and AGL V Robinson, DH.4 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
 The LFG Roland D.VI did not enjoy the success of its contemporaries, the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but was nonetheless a potent and capable fighter. Its unique Klinkerrumpf  fuselage construction made it both lightweight and robust although, despite its qualities, it was not built in large numbers. This particular example, a D.VIa, is shown chasing down a damaged Sopwith Camel  whilst being flown by Gefreiter Jakob Tischner of Jasta 35b. Tischner later wrote off this aircraft in a landing accident when he rolled into a parked Pfalz D.III, destroying both machines.

Gefreiter Jakob Tischner - Roland D.VIa by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
A poignant scene from the Battle of Britain, as a pair of battle weary Hurricanes return from a mission, young children play in the afternoon sun.

Salute the Few by Anthony Saunders (GL)
  USS Independence launches multiple aircraft, RA5C Vigilante from the waist cat, and a Crusader from the bow while deployed in the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.

USS Independence by Randall Wilson. (GL)
 Spitfires of No.19 Squadron RAF, including Flt Sgt George Unwin (QV-H) attack a formation of He111 bombers during the Battle of Britain.

Battle of Britain by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
 Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland.
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FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

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