Gerald Coulson Prints


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Aviation Art Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Gerald Coulson is without doubt one of the worlds top living artists. His paintings and prints of aviation art and landscape prints include many of the top selling images of the past 40 years. Many are now extremely rare. Cranston Fine Arts purchased the entire back catalogue of Gerald Coulson Solomon and Whitehead prints in 2008 and in 2011 purchased the aviation art prints from The Military Gallery. We do not sell to any other internet dealers so we can offer you great discounts and special packs at trade discount prices. We believe if a Gerald Coulson art collector wants to buy more than one or two prints then that collector should get the discount. You will find many rare and sought after pilot signed art prints here. Join our newsleter to get the latest special offers on Gerald Coulson art prints which are only available to newsletter and facebook members.



Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Search
Artist
Search
HALF PRICE GERALD COULSON PRINTS HERE!
Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus above first)
CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

Gerald Coulson Prints .com

SPECIAL OFFER

Get EXCLUSIVE deals on Gerald Coulson prints here!

Up to 60% off!

New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £170!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £190!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £145!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £210!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson


David Dipnall

Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

 Gerald Coulson's dramatic painting Bolt for the Blue, published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first flight of the Lightning, captures the very essence of this formidable fighter.  Seen climbing out of RAF Wattisham, a Lightning F.3 of Treble One Squadron scrambles to intercept an unidentified intruder plotted on the RAF's early warning radar.  Almost certainly it will be Russian, probably he will be escorted out of harms way, but the interceptor is armed with a pair of air-to-air missiles just in case.  A superb collector print for all who remember one of the greatest British fighters ever built.

A Bolt for the Blue by Gerald Coulson.
On July 21st 1951 WB188, the Hawker PIO67 Prototype, made its first flight from Boscombe Down, flown by Hawker Chief Test Pilot and WWII fighter ace, Squadron leader Neville Duke DSO, OBE, DFC**, AFC. This historic aircraft went on to become the Hunter, one of Britains most successful fighter aircraft. Created under the guiding hand of famed Hawker designer Sydney Camm, the PI067 Hunter became the RAFs standard single seat fighter from 1954 until 1960. It was also the first British produced swept-wing fighter to serve in large numbers in the RAF. The maiden flight was successful with only minor problems. Due to the undercarriage light staying on Neville Duke took the decision not to exceed 19,000 ft or 350 knots. The P1067 was Hawkers first application of powered controls but British experience of this was very limited at that time. Consequently the elevator hydraulic power boost was disconnected but the ailerons remained in use.This meant that the pilot struggled to maintain control especially on landing.  Neville Duke has fond memories of the aircraft, which has become synonymous with his name:  Of the multitude of designs from the board of Sydney Camm over a period of 43 years the Hunter is arguably the most graceful of all. The saying if it looks right it will fly right applies to the Hunter and can be illustrated by the fact that within some ten test flights the aircraft was flying in excess of 700mph, as demonstrated at the SBAC Farnborough Show shortly after the first flight. Sydney Camm proclaimed it to be his most beautiful design and I am not alone in claiming it to be a pilots aeroplane, a view expressed amongst the fighter pilots of the 21 nations who flew this aircraft in operational service up until 1995. Our aim was to give the pilots a fighter without limitations and this unique clearance was obtained. Long may we see them in the air as a tribute to the genius of Sydney Camm and his design team. Some 2000 Hunters were produced in the UK, Holland and Belgium and many more refurbished for 14 nations and returned to service through-out the world. The Hunter continues to serve in non-operational roles in various services and establishments as well as in private hands. WB 188 now resides in the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum, West Sussex.  This superb release by one of the masters of aviation art, Gerald Coulson, depicts the prototype on its historic first ever flight from Boscombe Down.

First Flight by Gerald Coulson. (AP)
A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs.

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target.  Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command.  The first four Squadrons – Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) – were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson (AP)

 A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of over fifty years ago.

Scramble by Gerald Coulson. (B)
It is June 1944 and, as dawn begins to break over East Anglia, Mosquito B Mk XVI bombers of the Light Night Striking Force return from a raid over Berlin. The sun is just beginning to rise and the peaceful tranquility is shattered as these majestic aircraft power in from the North Sea, flying at low level over the Norfolk marshes.

Home Run by Gerald Coulson.
 To commemorate this much-loved and incomparable aircraft, Gerald Coulsons evocative painting depicts a Mosquito B Mk. XVI, a high altitude bomber version, on operations deep over occupied Europe. In this guise the Mosquito was by far the fastest piston-engine bomber of World War II, and also the only light bomber capable of delivering the devastating 4,000lb block-buster bomb.
Mission by Moonlight by Gerald Coulson. (AP)


The Red Arrows by Gerald Coulson (B)

Gerald Coulson Special Offers :

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Leutnant Norbert Hannig

Norbert Hannig began operations with JG54 on the Eastern Front near Leningrad in early 1943, flying first the Messerschmitt Bf109G, later converting to the Fw190. He became a Staffelkapitan with JG54, notching up an impressive 42 victories. Towards the end of the war, in early 1945, he converted to fly the new jet fighter, the Me262, and flew it in combat with III./JG7 from their airfield base at Brandenberg-Briest.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)
It began in pitch darkness. June 6, 1944 was only a few minutes old when the Airborne Pathfinders drifted silently down from the sky above the fields of Normandy. At first their seemed nothing untoward about the drone of aircraft in the night sky. The German garrisons in Northern France were used to the noise of aircraft overhead after dark, but this night seemed particularly busy. Looking skyward a German sentry caught sight of parachutes floating down, clearly visible as the moon fleetingly broke through the clouds. For an instant he thought it was the crew jumping from a damaged bomber, but when he saw the mass of canopies floating earthwards, he knew it was no ordinary event. Within moments of raising the alarm the crackle of automatic gunfire confirmed his worst fears: The Invasion of France had begun. The first assault upon Hitlers Fortress Europe came from the sky. Shortly after midnight waves of aircraft and gliders delivered three Divisions of elite airborne troops into Normandy, their crucial objectives to seize vital bridges, secure strategic positions and clear the way for the coming aerial armada. As the first streaks of dawn came over the horizon on that historic day, and with American and British paratroops already engaged in furious fire fights, the mighty amphibious armada began landing on the beaches of Normandy. Above them waves of troop-carrying aircraft towing gliders stretched from the coast of France all the way back to England. Closely escorted by fighters, they delivered over 20,000 highly trained men into the battlefield of Northern France. By nightfall the first phase of the greatest military invasion in history was complete. Five Divisions were were ashore and the Allies had established a toehold in occupied Europe. For the Third Reich it was the beginning of the end. Without the advanced airborne assault, and the air supremacy achieved by the escort fighters, the amphibious landings could have been a disaster. Seen crossing the Normandy beaches are C-47 Dakotas of the 438th Troop Carrier Group towing CG-4 Waco gliders, closely escorted by P-51Bs of the 354 Fighter Group. Below, landing craft swarm ashore putting men and equipment on the beaches, and everything about this spectacular painting brings alive the events of that historic day a half a century ago.
D-Day The Airborne Assault by Robert Taylor. (GS)
The Battle of the Atlantic was fought by the Royal Navy and RAF Coastal Command against the U-boats. It was a long, deadly struggle in which Hitler’s prized U-boat fleet attempted to starve Britain of food, fuel and the materials of war by destroying the convoys that kept it supplied. The effective use of depth charges by Allied aircraft demanded an attack from extremely low level, but as each submarine was armed with 10 cannons, the dangers to the aircrews was immense.
Caught on the Surface by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 On Saturday, 9 August 1941 the unthinkable happened: the legendary Fighter leader Douglas Bader failed to return from a mission over northern France.  Immediately, without thought for their own safety, the fiercely loyal pilots of his Tangmere Wing set out on a sweep to search for him, hoping that he may have successfully baled out into the Channel. By nightfall, however, there was no sign of him and everyone feared that their famous Wing Leader might have been lost.  A few days later, however, the good news filtered into Tangmere; Bader, renowned as the Fighter Ace with artificial legs, had survived, albeit as a prisoner of war.
Bader Bus Company by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 A Schwarm of Bf109s from JG-52 are about to peel away and, with the battle-cry <i>Horrido!</i> ringing in their ears, dive to attack the flight of enemy aircraft spotted below.  JG-52: the name alone brought terror into the hearts of the Red Air Force pilots.  By the end of the war the Luftwaffe's most successful Geschwader had claimed over 10,000 victories, and from within its ranks emerged the top three scoring Aces in the history of air combat; Gerhard Barkhorn, Gunther Rall and, of course, the highest scorer of them all – Erich Hartmann.
JG52 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Claim a FREE PRINT
Worth up to £100!
when you spend over £220

SEE BASKET AT TOP OF THIS PAGE FOR DETAILS.

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109.

Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman.
 Wing Commander Ken Wallis flies his WA-115 autogyro over the Shinmoi Crater in the Krishima area of the southern Japanese island of Kyushu in preparation for filming the action sequences for the James Bond film <i>You Only Live Twice</i>.  Those of us who enjoy a certain series of spy films will be much aware of Little Nellie, designed by Wing Commander Ken Wallis MBE She is pictured flying above the tops of extinct volcanoes.  Little Nellie was one of 3 military Type WA-116 built during 1962 and one of these remains today taking part in military exercises and with camouflage bodywork.  These operate in remote military and civilian roles and a specially-silenced WA-117 was used during the Loch Ness investigation and for special photography in Saudi Arabia.  These effective and nimble autogyros have been flown from Naval patrol craft which are too small for helicopters.  The Wallis autogyros have held all 20 of the UK official world records for autogyro speed, time to climb, altitude, range and duration and even now, further world record-breaking flights are being planned.

Little Nellie by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
 American built, British inspired and once re-engined with the Merlin, the mighty Mustang became a supreme long-range escort fighter and close air support platform. Old Crow was the mount of Clarence E. Anderson based at Leiston, England, with the 357th FG, 363rd FS. Andersons personal victory score during WWII was 16.25 in air combat.
Winter of 45 by Philip West. (Y)
 George Beurling in Spitfire VC BR301 in action against a Macchi 202 over Malta in 1942.

Victory Over Malta by Ivan Berryman. (P)
In the early summer of 1944 the Me 262 became the worlds first operational jet aircraft. With a top speed of 540 mph it easily outperformed any Allied aircraft of WWII, and went on to revolutionise aerial warfare. A truly remarkable aircraft.
Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Me262A-1a by Barry Price.
 79 Sqn Hurricane of F/Lt Owen Tracey trying to get airborne again amid explosions from the attacking German Dorniers on 15th August 1940.

Tribute to F/Lt Owen Tracey by Ivan Berryman. (P)


Prelude by Geoffrey R Herickx. (Y)
DHM265. Desert Prang by Geoff Lea.

Desert Prang by Geoff Lea.
SPECIAL
PAGES

FREE PRINTS

Purchase any print from our special selection of Gerald Coulson prints, and get a FREE print with it!

FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

More Pages :

 

Gerald Coulson has been painting professionally for over 30 years.  the Fine Art Guild have placed him among the top ten best selling UK artists no less than 15 times in 12 years - 3 times at No. 1.  Coulson's first love was aircraft, studying them and drawing them at every opportunity, from an early age.  His apprenticeship as an aircraft engineer  then as an RAF Technician and later an engineer with British Airways, have allowed him an insight and intimate knowledge of the aircraft he paints.  Now a Vice President, he is a founder member of the Guild of Aviation Artists and four times winner of the Flight International Trophy for outstanding aviation painting.  He qualified for his pilots licence in 1960 and is still actively flying today - mostly vintage aircraft and can often be seen buzzing over the Fens of Cambridgeshire in a Tiger Moth.  Whatever the subject, whether aviation, landscape or portrait, his ability to capture the realism and mood of the scene is unsurpassed, making him one of the most collected and highly regarded artists in the world today. 

 

Coulson Royal Air Force Prints ] Coulson US Air Force Prints ] Coulson German Air Force Prints ] Coulson Civilian Aircraft Prints ] Coulson Motor Racing Prints ] Coulson Landscapes ] Coulson Wildlife Prints ] Gerald Coulson Print List ]