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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £155!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £210!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £130!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £220!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson

David Dipnall
Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

 Eddie Irivine winning his first Grand Prix in his Ferrari at Melbourne, Australia, 7th March 1999.  Starting from 6th on the grid, Eddie finished just one second ahead of German Heinz-Harald Frentzen in the #8 Jordan.

The Wizard of Oz by Gerald Coulson.
After having shot down an Albatros DV over Ypres, captain Billy Barker in his personal aircraft B6313 leads his flight of novices in loose formation back to Allied Lines. Flying West into the early evening sun against the back drop of a dramatic skyline the four Sopwith Camels head back to their base at St Omer.

Patrolling the Line by Gerald Coulson.
Few pilots can resist the temptation for low flying should the opportunity present itself. Out of sight of the spoil-sport eyes of the authority, the rules will be broken, the artist would indulge in this chancy but undeniable thrill. A great sensation from any cockpit but for the artist nothing can compare with the effect from behind a pair of goggles to the accompaniment of humming wires around the cockpit of a Tiger Moth.

Happy Days by Gerald Coulson.
The Vickers-Armstrong Wellington entered service life in the RAF in 1938 as a medium bomber. As the mainstay of the Bomber Command, it bore the initial brunt of the RAFs night offensive during 1940. Without the benefit of sophisticated navigation aids, the bomber crews had difficulty locating and hitting targets and also contending with rapidly improving German defences.  The picture depicts an incident at sunrise on the morning of 26th July 1940.  A Wellington 1c of 99 Squadron, based at Newmarket Heath, returns from a raid over Dortmund.  An engine fails over the North Sea and the aircraft, captained by Squadron Leader Sarll, struggled almost to its home base and crashed just south of Cambridge.  The crew survived.

Overdue by Gerald Coulson.

Big Brothers and Little Friends : the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitlers Nazi Germany, 1942-1945.

Top Cover by Gerald Coulson (AP)


The Red Arrows by Gerald Coulson (B)
 The 70th Anniversary of the Spitfire 1936-2006. Geralds majestic study of Spitfire prototype K5054, resplendent in its new all-blue paint scheme, is seen banking high above the clouds during an early test flight in March 1936. As the little fighter lifted off Eastleigh airfield into the early spring sunshine, Summers knew immediately that Supermarine had created a thoroughbred. Powered by a 900hp Rolls Royce Merlin engine, the prototype at once displayed superb handling qualities and performance, achieving almost 350mph in level flight. Thus was born the Spitfire, the most famous British aircraft of all time. The Spitfire was to become the most important single type Allied aircraft of World War Two, was built in greater numbers than any other Allied fighter, and remianed in production throughout the war. Its superb design allowed the airframe to be continually developed and by the end of the war, now with twice the engine power, Mitchells little fighter had won its place in history. Adored by its pilots, in experienced hands the Spitfire was invincible in close air-to-air combat.
Rhapsody in Blue by Gerald Coulson. (B)
 The prototype Spitfire on its maiden flight on 5th March 1936.
Birth of a Legend by Gerald Coulson.

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Friedrich-Karl Paul (deceased)

As Captain of the Kriegsmarine torpedo-boat Jaguar, Paul took part as an escort in the Channel Dash breakthrough of February 1942 and shot down 3 aircraft on the mission. In March he successfully captured a Royal Navy launch and in October his torpedo-boat sank the British cruiser Charybdis in the English Channel. He later served in the Baltic, his ship shooting down 7 Russian planes and sinking 1 submarine. He was awarded the Knights Cross in 1945. He died 1st May 1998.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman.
 Arguably the best known of all World War 1 fighter aces, Mannfred von Richthofen, the 'Red Baron', is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final livery following the introduction of the <i>Balkenkreuze</i>, early in 1918. Contrary to popular belief, this was the only Triplane flown by the <i>Rittmeister</i> that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Greatest of Them All - Manfred von Richthofen by Ivan Berryman.
 Perhaps the greatest exponent of Fokker's Eindecker series of aircraft, Max Immelmann is credited with 15 aerial victories and was the first fighter pilot ever to win the coveted Pour le Mérite. He was killed on 18th June 1916 during combat with British FE.2B fighters of 25 Sqn.

The First Ace - Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman.
 The great Werner Voss is depicted in his Fokker F1 103/17 of Jasta 10 in the Summer of 1917. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary airmanship, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down and killed by Lieutenant Rhys Davids' SE5 on the very day that he was due to go on leave. The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss' machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine and his aircraft was not fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Into the Sun - Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman.
Tiger Moth G-AOEI owned by Cambridge Flying Group over the Cambridge countryside.

A Special Breed by Gerald Coulson.
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 VC.10, serial No 885 was the last of its type to be built at Brooklands and is seen here taking to the air on 16th February 1970 in her East African Airlines livery as 5H-MOG. This aircraft was later acquired by the Royal Air Force and registered as ZA150, serving as a K3 with 101 Sqn until her eventual retirement in 2013, this veteran of 43 years service landing for the final time at Dunsfold where she will be preserved as part of the Brooklands Museum.

Last of the Line by Ivan Berryman. (P)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland.
 It required more than a little nerve to fly a fighter into the barrage of fire sprayed out by the gunners of a box of B17 bombers; it took even greater courage to do so in the rocket propelled Me163 Komet.  With rocket science still in its infancy, these small aircraft were still in the experimental stage, and piloting what amounted to a flying bomb was in itself a perilous business, let alone flying them into combat.  But these were desperate times.  The day and night bombing assault on Germany was bringing the mighty war machine to its knees, and aything that might help stem the tide was thrown into battle.  Powered by a mixture of two highly volatile chemicals, the slightest leak, or heavy landing could cause a huge explosion, and the mix was so corrosive that in the event of even a minor accident, the pilot could literally be dissolved.  Sitting in a cramped cockpit, surrounded by dangerous chemicals and ammunition, the intrepid aviator would be launched into the sky on what was, at best, a four minute mission.  After, hopefully, engaing the enemy, he would glide powerlessly back to the nearest airfield to be refuelled so as to attempt the hazardous operation all over again.  Though limited to a handful of victories, the Komet did make the Allied crews wonder what else the Luftwaffe had hidden up its sleeve, and had the distinction of being the forerunner of aircraft technology that eventually took aircraft into space.  Capable of nearly 600mph and climbing to 30,000ft in less than two minutes, this tiny rocket propelled Me163 Komet was typical of Germanys ingenuity in its desperate attempts to stem the havoc being wreaked by the USAAFs daylight bombers.

Rocket Attack by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
In this lovely picture from Graham Bosworth, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) is seen flying past the very famous Boston Stump in Lincolnshire (properly known as St Botolph*#39;s Church).  Called the Boston 'Stump' because the tower was completed over a period of 100 years, appearing as a stump on the horizon (alternative theory is that the tower should have had a spire on top of it and the 'stump' is therefore the base.  St Botolph's is one of the largest parish churches in England.  Founded in 1390, St Botolph's is aiming to raise £3,000,000 by 2009 in time for its 700th birthday and for much-needed restoration.  The BBMF is much beloved by many people of all ages and the sounds of the engines from these World War II aircraft still draws the crowds.  Based at Conningsby in Lincolnshire the formation displays throughout Europe.

Salute to the Stump by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
An Me109 claims another Russian victim during the push on the eastern front in 1942.

Combat over the Russian Front by Jason Askew. (P)
 The Savoia Marchetti SM.79s of the 281a Squadriglia were to become notorious for their daring attacks on allied shipping in the Mediterranean from their bases in Libya throughout 1940.  Among the most celebrated of  Italian pilots was Capitani Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia, seen here claiming another victim in his personal aircraft 281-5.

Scourge of the Mediterranean - Tribute to Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Hurricane LK-M of No.87 Squadron piloted by Flt Lt Alex Thom DFC limps over the south coast of England on 19th August 1942. While supporting troops on the ground at Dieppe, the Hurricane was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. Alex Thom got the damaged aircraft back to Britain, making a forced landing at East Den. Ferried back to 87 Sqns airfield, he immediately set off once more for Dieppe in Hurricane LK-A.

A Welcome Shore by Ivan Berryman.
 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.
 British European Airways aircraft enroute to Northern Ireland.

Vickers Vanguard 1970s by David Pentland. (GS)

FREE PRINTS

Purchase any print from our special selection of Gerald Coulson prints, and get a FREE print with it!

FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

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Coulson Royal Air Force Prints ] Coulson US Air Force Prints ] Coulson German Air Force Prints ] Coulson Civilian Aircraft Prints ] Coulson Motor Racing Prints ] Coulson Landscapes ] Coulson Wildlife Prints ] Gerald Coulson Print List ]

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