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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £155!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £210!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £130!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £220!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson

David Dipnall
Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

Tiger Moth G-AOEI owned by Cambridge Flying Group over the Cambridge countryside.

A Special Breed by Gerald Coulson.
On July 21st 1951 WB188, the Hawker PIO67 Prototype, made its first flight from Boscombe Down, flown by Hawker Chief Test Pilot and WWII fighter ace, Squadron leader Neville Duke DSO, OBE, DFC**, AFC. This historic aircraft went on to become the Hunter, one of Britains most successful fighter aircraft. Created under the guiding hand of famed Hawker designer Sydney Camm, the PI067 Hunter became the RAFs standard single seat fighter from 1954 until 1960. It was also the first British produced swept-wing fighter to serve in large numbers in the RAF. The maiden flight was successful with only minor problems. Due to the undercarriage light staying on Neville Duke took the decision not to exceed 19,000 ft or 350 knots. The P1067 was Hawkers first application of powered controls but British experience of this was very limited at that time. Consequently the elevator hydraulic power boost was disconnected but the ailerons remained in use.This meant that the pilot struggled to maintain control especially on landing.  Neville Duke has fond memories of the aircraft, which has become synonymous with his name:  Of the multitude of designs from the board of Sydney Camm over a period of 43 years the Hunter is arguably the most graceful of all. The saying if it looks right it will fly right applies to the Hunter and can be illustrated by the fact that within some ten test flights the aircraft was flying in excess of 700mph, as demonstrated at the SBAC Farnborough Show shortly after the first flight. Sydney Camm proclaimed it to be his most beautiful design and I am not alone in claiming it to be a pilots aeroplane, a view expressed amongst the fighter pilots of the 21 nations who flew this aircraft in operational service up until 1995. Our aim was to give the pilots a fighter without limitations and this unique clearance was obtained. Long may we see them in the air as a tribute to the genius of Sydney Camm and his design team. Some 2000 Hunters were produced in the UK, Holland and Belgium and many more refurbished for 14 nations and returned to service through-out the world. The Hunter continues to serve in non-operational roles in various services and establishments as well as in private hands. WB 188 now resides in the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum, West Sussex.  This superb release by one of the masters of aviation art, Gerald Coulson, depicts the prototype on its historic first ever flight from Boscombe Down.

First Flight by Gerald Coulson. (AP)
It is June 1944 and, as dawn begins to break over East Anglia, Mosquito B Mk XVI bombers of the Light Night Striking Force return from a raid over Berlin. The sun is just beginning to rise and the peaceful tranquility is shattered as these majestic aircraft power in from the North Sea, flying at low level over the Norfolk marshes.

Home Run by Gerald Coulson (B)
Johnnie Johnson, the RAFs highest-scoring fighter pilot of World War II flies his Spitfire F MkIXE back to base in Kenley.

Johnny Comes Home by Gerald Coulson.



The Red Arrows by Gerald Coulson (B)
  Its a cold, misty winters day early in 1943 and a pair of Mosquitoes B. Mk IV return from a low level precision bombing raid over Occupied Europe.  As the sun rises over the East Anglian countryside the unmistakable sound of Merlin Engines shatter the silence as these magnificent aircraft emerge from the mist skimming across the landscape, heading back to their Norfolk base.  Gerald Coulson has captured the scene perfectly, once again proving that he is a true Master in his field, combining the technical accuracy of this powerful aircraft with his ability to capture the mood and feeling of a cold winter landscape.
Country Life 43 by Gerald Coulson.
GC193. British Aerospace Concorde by Gerald Coulson.
British Aerospace Concorde by Gerald Coulson.
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1.  The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles.  Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races.  World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster.  Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions.  At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson.

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

S/Sgt Robert Cinibulk

Waist Gunner of B-17 Flying Fortress "Lazy Baby".

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Spitfire P9433 DW-E of  No.610 flown by P/O Pegge, in which he shot down two Bf.109Es on 12th August 1940.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Pegge of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
 The Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 Erich Rudorffer is depicted in Fw190A-6 'Black Double Chevron' over the misty forests of Finland in June 1944. Credited with 222 aerial victories, he survived being shot down no less than sixteen times and survived the war until eventually passing away in 2016 aged 98.

Erich Rudorffer by Ivan Berryman.
 F/Lt Warner was shot down in combat with Bf 109s on 16th August 1940 at 17:15hrs off Dungeness.  He was flying Spitfire DW-Z (R6802).

Tribute to Flight Lieutenant Warner of No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Spitfire DW-U (W3455) of 610 Squadron escorting Blenheims to Le Trait on 21st August 1941.  This aircraft was shot down by enemy fighters on this mission.

Escorting Blenheims to Le Trait - Spitfire W3455 of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 During the Falklands conflict in 1982, the tiny mid-Atlantic volcanic island of Ascension became the starting point for the <i>Black Buck</i> missions - a relay of tanker aircraft refueling two Vulcan bombers to attack Argentine positions and damage the runway at Port Stanley to prevent the use of fast jets.  At the time these were the longest range bombing missions in history.

Ascension Departure by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 During the Falklands conflict in 1982, the tiny mid-Atlantic volcanic island of Ascension became the starting point for the <i>Black Buck</i> missions - a relay of tanker aircraft refueling two Vulcan bombers to attack Argentine positions and damage the runway at Port Stanley to prevent the use of fast jets.  At the time these were the longest range bombing missions in history.

Vulcan at Ascension, 1982 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 With 275 victories credited, Gunther Rall is the third highest scoring Ace in history  He was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Gunther Rall by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Walter Wolfrum, a Knight's Cross winning German WW2 Ace with 137 victories, in his Bf109G.

Walter Wolfrum by Ivan Berryman. (P)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety.

Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (GL)
 Handley Page 0/400s are attacked by German Albatross fighters as they return home from a raid during 1918.

Difficult Journey Home by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
 Posted to 64 Squadron on 1st July 1940, the tragically short relationship of Sub Lt F Dawson Paul with the Spitfire was crammed with victories.  He immediately shared a Dornier Do17 off Beachy Head and, just four days later claimed a Messerschmitt Bf.109.  Further kills were confirmed over the next two weeks, among them five Bf.110s and another Do.17. His final victory was a Bf.109 on 25th, but on this day he fell to the guns of the German ace Adolf Galland.  Dawson Paul was rescued from the English Channel by a German E-boat, but died of his wounds five days later as a prisoner of war.

The Longest July by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 Celebrating its 50th year of faithful service in 2012, the Vickers VC10 has proved to be one of the most enduring types in British aviation.  The final role for these elegant veterans has been to provide mid-air refueling for the RAF, as typified here by C.1K XV106 'W' of 101 Sqn, Brize Norton.  Retirement is planned for March 2013 for the final few serving aircraft, closing a significant chapter in the history of jet age.

Tribute to the VC10 by Ivan Berryman.
 Lancasters of 61 Squadron head out for the enemy coast during the night of 3rd November 1943. Seen in the lead Lancaster is Flt Lt Bill Reid flying QR-O. After sustaining two heavy attacks by enemy night fighters, killing two crew members and injuring Reid in the head, shoulders and hands. He carried on to the target, dropping accurately his bomb load. Navigating back by Pole Star and Moon, he lost consciousness on occasions due to blood loss. He managed to find his way Shipdharn. Upon landing the undercarriage collapsed but luckily did not catch fire. For his exploits that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
 Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived.

Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.
 Personnel from the Joint Helicopter Support Unit controlling a 105mm Light Gun lift, with Boeing HC2 Chinook helicopters of the Royal Air Force, as part of the Implementation Force in the former Republic of Yugoslavia.  This was during Operation RESOLUTE which commenced in December 1995.

Gun Lift at Mrkonjic Grad by David Rowlands (GS)
 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (B)

FREE PRINTS

Purchase any print from our special selection of Gerald Coulson prints, and get a FREE print with it!

FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

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