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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL GERALD COULSON PRINTS BY TITLE

New Print Packs
RAF Typhoon Aviation Prints by Ivan Berryman and Gerald Coulson.
Bombs

Bombs Away by Ivan Berryman.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £185!
JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Graeme Lothian.
Morning

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Combat

Combat Over Normandy by Graeme Lothian.
Save £210!
Hawker Hurricane Aviation Art Prints by David Pentland and Gerald Coulson.
Night

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (H)
Moonlight

Moonlight Hunter by Gerald Coulson.
Save £75!
Normandy Invasion Typhoon Aviation Art by Richard Tayor and Gerald Coulson.
Typhoons

Typhoons Outward Bound by Richard Taylor.
Normandy

Normandy Sunrise by Gerald Coulson.
Save £160!
Lancaster Bomber Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Welcome
Welcome Home by Stephen Brown.
Alone

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson.
Save £220!
FEATURED LANDSCAPE ARTISTS

Bill Makinson

David Dipnall
Rex Preston
 
COULSON TOP TEN
ONE

Outbound Lancaster
TWO

Quiet Forest
THREE

Striking Back
FOUR

Silent Majesty
FIVE

A Moment of Triumph

POPULAR PRINTS

Over the past 20 years the fine art trade polls have placed Gerald Coulson in the Top Ten Best Selling Artists no less than 15 times and on three occasions he has been the top selling artist. This record was never previously achieved. Gerald Coulson is without doubt regarded as one of the world's foremost landscape and aviation artists of all time. Gerald Coulson has been painting for over 60 years and in 1955 was elected to membership of the Society of Aviation Artists which was reformed as the Guild of Aviation Artists in the 1970's. Gerald was one of the founder members. Gerald Coulson's first consuming interest is aircraft, which he studied at every opportunity. He served eight years in the Royal Air Force before joining British European Airways as an aircraft engineer at London Airport. This time in the RAF and as a aircraft engineer proved invaluable to his painting, as it provided unlimited subject matter.  His knowledge of aircraft engineering and drawing ability allowed him to move into the world of technical illustration and he spent ten years illustrating technical manuals for civil and military aircraft. During this time he learned to fly and made his first solo flight in a de Havilland Tiger Moth. Gerald Coulson has since flown a number of other types of aircraft, a valuable asset to his paintings. Gerald has also produced some of the world's top landscape paintings, produced over the past 50 years which are now very rare and sought after.  GeraldCoulsonprints.com is unquestionably the internet's only one stop shop for all Gerald Coulson art prints available today. We have sought out the last remaining stocks from publishers who are no longer around, to offer the best selection and the best prices, with many special offers and discounts for multi purchase orders.  The majority of these art prints are not available anywhere else. We have been publishing and selling artwork for 30 years and our fast, fully guaranteed and reliable service direct to the public around the world is second to none. Our customers in the United States and Canada benefit from a special Fed Ex discount service which means they normally get their orders within only a few working days.

FEATURED GERALD COULSON PRINTS

<b>Sold out at publisher.  We have the last 150 remaining prints.

Spitfire Magic by Gerald Coulson.
 The roar of Daimler-Benz engines at full power awakens the day as Gunther Lutzow, his aircraft still in the markings of his previous unit JG51, leads his Me109Fs of JG3 into combat from a snow covered airfield at Schatalowka on the Russian Front, in December 1941. With prints signed by no less than four veteran Me109 pilots who fought on the cruel Eastern Front, this is sure to be a valuable addition to any aviation art collection.

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson. (B)
 Mick Martin's Lancaster pulls away from the Möhne Dam, his Upkeep bomb exploding behind him sending a huge plume of water into the air.  Guy Gibson flies to his right drawing flak from the anti-aircraft guns on the towers.

The Dambusters by Gerald Coulson. (C)
Big Brothers and Little Friends : the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitlers Nazi Germany, 1942-1945.

Top Cover by Gerald Coulson (AP)

Published in 1994, this classic English landscape by Gerald Coulson was published by Solomon and Whitehead, a company who are no longer publishing.

Country Life by Gerald Coulson.


Dusk by Gerald Coulson.
The Avro Lancaster was possibly the most versatile and successful bomber aircraft ever and certainly became the backbone of RAF Bomber Command during WWII. Being able to deliver a greater payload than any other aircraft of The War, the Lancaster was involved in nearly every night bombing raid on Europe and undertook some of the most famous bombing missions in History.  Of all the crews of RAF Bomber Command 617 Squadron are perhaps the best known. Famed for their expertise in precision bombing they took part in some of the most daring raids of the War. Many of the crews such as Guy Gibson, Leonard Cheshire and Bill Reid became household names and their exploits are well documented. This superb painting by Gerald Coulson is a tribute to all those crews who flew with Bomber Command. Each print is personally signed by prominent crew who flew with 617 Squadron during WWII. Coulsons painting captures the moment perfectly. As the sun is setting in the early part of 1944 over their Lincolnshire airfield , groundcrews make final preparations to the Lancasters of 617 Squadron. Beneath the mighty aircraft crews ready themselves for a long , gruelling night operation over occupied Europe.

A Lincolnshire Sunset 1944 by Gerald Coulson (AP)
Heavily damaged by flak and with one engine out, a Lancaster slowly makes its way home far behind the main force

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson (B)

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Group Captain Sir Hugh Dundas CBE DSO DFC DI (deceased)

Hugh Dundas was born on the 2nd of July 1920 in Doncaster. Hugh Dundas, like his elder brother John, became fascinated by the idea of flying from childhood, and straight after leaving Stowe School in 1938 joined the Auxiliary Air Force. As a pre-war member of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, Hugh Dundas was called up early in the war, serving with 616 Squadron. After a promising start as a fighter pilot, Dundas was shot down on 22nd August and wounded during the Battle of Britian, but returned to his squadron in September 1940. His brother John, a 12 victory ace with No.609 Squadron, was killed in action in November 1940 after shooting down the top–scoring German Luftwaffe ace at the time, Helmut Wick. In early 1941 he was at Tangmere and came under the command of Wing Commander Douglas Bader. Dundas became one of the leading members of that Wing and frequently flew with Bader, gradually building his reputation as a fighter pilot and tactician. After receiving the DFC, Dundas became Flight Commander in 610 Squadron. December 1941 brought another promotion as commanding officer of 56 Squadron, the first in the RAF to be converted to Typhoons. Posted to the Mediterranean in 1943, he led 244 Spitfire Wing from Malta and later Italy. In 1944, Dundas was awarded the DSO and became one of the youngest Group Captains in the RAF. For some years after the war, Dundas served once more with the RAuxAF during which time he became CO of 601 Squadron. His war time score was 4 destroyed, 6 shared destroyed, 2 shared probables, and 2 and 1 shared damaged. After the war had ended Dundas served with the RAuxAF as CO of No.601 Squadron and was the air correspondent for the Daily Express newspaper. In 1961 he joined Rediffusion ltd becoming a Director in 1966, and Chairman of Thames Television unitl 1987, when he was knighted. In 1989 he served as High Sheriff of Surrey. Sir Hugh Dundas died on 10th July 1995 at the age of 74.

View prints signed by this pilot

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (PC)
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

A selection of current half price aviation prints : 

 The Jasta was part of the Flying Circus, and one of the first units to receive and be fully equipped with the new Pfaltz DIII aircraft. In their capable hands this elegant aircraft proved an effective weapon.

Jasta 10, Northern France Early September 1917 by David Pentland. (GL)
 Hypothetical engagement, Soviet airforce MIG19 shoots down a USAF RB47 Stratofortress during the 1960s.

Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland. (GS)
 Designed by Hugo Junkers, the J.1 was the worlds first all-metal aircraft to go into mass production and proved very successful in its intended role as an observation and ground attack aircraft. The sheer strength of its structure and mass of load-bearing struts eliminated the need for bracing wires and the outer portions of the wings were not linked by interplane struts, affording the observer / gunner a clear field. The crew and engine were protected from ground fire with 5mm armour plate, all of which added to the considerable weight of the J.1, which suffered with relatively poor performance as a consequence. It was powered by a 200hp Benz BZ.IV inline engine and well over 200 of this innovative machine were put into service during 1918.

Junkers J.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
 Dauntless Dive Bombers Dive on the Battleship Musashi in the Sibuyan Sea, October 1944.

Pressing Home the Kill by Randall Wilson (GL)
 Lancasters - B1 R5689 VN-N 50th Squadron RAF leads a gaggle of Lancs as they gain altitude to form up over the English coast.
Forming Up by Randall Wilson. (GL)
 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work.

Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
 When the seasoned B-26 crews of the 386th Bomb Group took delivery of their Douglas A-26 Invader aircraft in September 1944, the arrival of their new fast attack bombers neatly coincided with a move to France. Now based at Beaumont-sur-Oise, they were able to penetrate deep into enemy territory. The three man crews took part in the Battle of the Bulge, their twin engined aircraft being well suited to their task of destroying strategic bridges and cutting vital supply lines. After the Ardennes Campaign, now fully equipped with the A-26, the 386th BG continued to strike hard against important targets in Germany, the nimble handling characteristics of the aircraft making low-level attacks a speciality. As the Allies advanced upon Germany the 386th moved to St. Trond in Belgium, their base at the time of Nicolas Trudgians dramatic painting. Arriving at high speed over the busy German rail yard in the heart of the Ruhr Valley, barely skimming the nearby factory chimney stacks on the way into the target, the A-26 crews on the 386th deliver a devastating blow, leaving a trail of destruction in their wake. With bombs away, the Invader crews strafe the area with their battery of ten forward-firing .50 cal. machine guns, the roar of their twin 2000hp engines heightening the tension and confusion on the ground. <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Signed by three distinguished A-26 Invader aircrew who flew the A-26 in combat during World War II.</b>

Ruhr Valley Invaders by Nicolas Trudgian.
In this lovely picture from Graham Bosworth, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) is seen flying past the very famous Boston Stump in Lincolnshire (properly known as St Botolph*#39;s Church).  Called the Boston 'Stump' because the tower was completed over a period of 100 years, appearing as a stump on the horizon (alternative theory is that the tower should have had a spire on top of it and the 'stump' is therefore the base.  St Botolph's is one of the largest parish churches in England.  Founded in 1390, St Botolph's is aiming to raise £3,000,000 by 2009 in time for its 700th birthday and for much-needed restoration.  The BBMF is much beloved by many people of all ages and the sounds of the engines from these World War II aircraft still draws the crowds.  Based at Conningsby in Lincolnshire the formation displays throughout Europe.

Salute to the Stump by Graham Bosworth. (Y)

FREE PRINTS

Purchase any print from our special selection of Gerald Coulson prints, and get a FREE print with it!

FEATURED AVIATION ARTISTS


Ivan Berryman

Nicolas Trudgian

David Pentland

Robert Taylor

Anthony Saunders
FEATURED SIGNATURES

Cyril Bamberger

Gunther Rall

Roland Beamont

Billy Drake

Ivor Broom

Bud Anderson
COULSON TOP TEN
SIX

Friendly Persuasion
SEVEN

Merlins Over Malta
EIGHT

Off Duty Lancaster at Rest
NINE

A Frosty Morning
TEN

Summer Harvest

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Coulson Royal Air Force Prints ] Coulson US Air Force Prints ] Coulson German Air Force Prints ] Coulson Civilian Aircraft Prints ] Coulson Motor Racing Prints ] Coulson Landscapes ] Coulson Wildlife Prints ] Gerald Coulson Print List ]

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